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April 2017 Archives

Fathers can fight for child custody

While courts in North Carolina used to rule in favor of the mother when it came to child custody, attitudes have changes and most judges have realized that all parents should have an equal chance to take care of their children. We at Marshall and Taylor know how important it is for you to have a fair chance at child custody, whether you are a mom or a dad.

Homemaker vs. breadwinner: Who wins during property division?

Family functions have changed over the years. In many modern households, both spouses work full time -- an arrangement unheard of not so many years ago. In such a situation, each partner likely contributes fairly equally to the marital assets from a financial point of view. Should the couple divorce, dividing the assets may be reasonably straightforward, though likely not without some conflict.

How can I make the most of my visitation?

When a judge in North Carolina must divide custody of your child between you and your ex-spouse, having contact with both of you will benefit the child more than if your relationships is completely cut off. The psychological drawbacks of ending all communication with either parent can be long-lasting, so maintaining visitation is important to the mental health of your family. While you may feel upset that you do not have as much custody as you would like, the important thing is to build a strong bond with your child during the time you have together. The Supervised Visitation Network outlines how you can make the most of your visitation time.

What rights does a putative father have?

One of the biggest changes that the many children being born out of wedlock has brought is that, in matters of divorce or separation, the father’s legal relationship to the child has not always been established. If you find yourself in this position in Virginia and are not sure about your rights, ChildWelfare.gov has created literature that can explain the situation.