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August 2017 Archives

What are considerations in out-of-state visitation schedules?

If you are in a situation where you or the child's other parent has moved out of the state of North Carolina, then you may be dealing with developing a new visitation plan. While this scenario is not ideal, it is something that many families deal with. This means there are some great tips and lot of advice out there to help you as you work on your own plan.

What are the responsibilities of sole custody?

Divorced parents of children in North Carolina will have to decide whether joint or sole custody is better for their particular situation. If you're considering sole custody of your child, you should go into the arrangement understanding what sort of responsibilities will be on your shoulders.

Paternity testing and DNA fraud

Potential fathers in North Carolina are usually required to take a paternity test to determine if they are the father of the child. These tests are done using DNA samples from the child, father and mother. Samples are then tested, compared and analyzed to determine if the man could be the father. As with any type of laboratory test, there is the potential for fraud or mistakes.

What is an action for support of a minor child?

If you are like most North Carolina parents, you realize that you and your spouse are responsible for the support of your children and welcome this responsibility. In some divorce situations, however, one parent may not be as willing as he or she should be to provide support. In such situations, Section 50.13.4 of the North Carolina Statutes sets forth the requirements for an action for support of a minor child.

What is supervised visitation?

In North Carolina, it is possible for a judge to order supervised visitation in a custody case. While this ruling is not used often, it is used when absolutely necessary to protect the children involved. Visitation is important for families, so being ordered to undergo supervised visitation can be a blow.